Recipe Sunday: Granny’s Homeade Fry Bread

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When I was little, until I was eight years old I lived in a small dirty white little farmhouse on the end of old dirt road in Boone, Iowa. My parents being split up, my father and my sisters and I lived in their home with them. We have left the trailer house across the way and stayed with them, I guess so there was someone to watch us. I didn’t mind and in fact loved living there.

Being the bay of the family, I was not of dating age and the other girls would run off to spend time with friends and I would sit and listen to granny’s stories of the old farmhouse, the land and of daddy and the Hunter’s for hours. She would tell me how the house was converted from an old schoolhouse to the home we lived in, stories of how they sold off parts of the farm as they got older and stories of recipes came to be.

I remember mornings waking up to the smell of homemade bread cooking downstairs and I would come bounding down the stairs so hard I often would worry if the floor would fall beneath me. As I would get to the base of the stairs Grandpa would cold me for coming down the stairs so fast and hard but I didn’t care. All I wanted was a taste of that bread. You see, I remember a story Granny told me, being a perfectionist she was, that she wanted each of the loaves to be the same size and because of this she would always have a few extra pieces of dough left over and she would put oil in the pan and fry them up. She learned this from her mother and so on.

So when homemade bread was cooking I just knew there was going to be fry bread soon after. I didn’t even care that it was 5 am in the morning! The early bird gets the worm right? Or in this case, the early girl gets the bread!

I loved watching her make bread. To me it was like a magic art. Add a few simple ingredients.  Add this magical white dust to the bowl. Add more magical white dust to the table. all of a sudden a big blob of something came out of the bowl and would land on this powdery dust then poof, dust would go everywhere and float through the air, wafting through the kitchen on kitchen fairy wings.  She kneaded the dough over and over but not too much. Even by the time I was eight her hands were frail but that did not stop her. She worked the dough, folding it over and over til it was just right. Then she would take this slender knife with a serrated edge and slice pieces of bread and fold them in such a fashion that by itself seemed magical to make it into a perfect shape to fit into the bread tins.

Then whatever was left over and would slice off and roll then pat flattened and work almost like she was making mini pizzas and then add them to this sizzling pan of hot oil, turn the pieces over with tongs and then take them out and put them onto a plate with a hand towel. No paper towels for this lady. She believed that there was no reason to waste when using a real town was just good enough and could be washed and hung on the line at a later time.

After blotting dry she would serve them up to us one by one hot off the plate right onto ours with a jar of her homemade jam or jelly.

It was always such a treat to have fry bread because you did have to get up early to get it, it wasn’t something she always made because if her loaves were perfect that day, no dough was leftover, so it was hit and miss, but oh man, when you could get your hands on Granny’s Homemade Fry Bread. mmm, you wanted to eat it all day! Mouthwatering and delicious couldn’t even begin to describe it!

I asked Granny if she ever just made fry bread and she said yes but as often as she used to. When I was older she shared with the family and us kids many Recipes. I don’t know how exact this is, but this is her Fry Bread Recipe as best as I can remember it if you aren’t making whole loaves of bread.

I got up this morning and shared with my man my stories and my Fry Bread goodnes and he loved it. Now he wants me to make it all the time for his lunches and for tacos and other bread replacements in our house. Maybe you will too! If you make it, I would love to hear what you think, how you use it and how it went over in YOUR house?

ENJOY!

You Need-
4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 1/2 cups warm water
4 cups shortening for frying (I used Canola oil whihc is good for High Heat cooking)
How To:
Combine flour, salt, and baking powder. Stir in 1 1/2 cups lukewarm water. Knead until soft but not sticky. Shape dough into balls about 3 inches in diameter. Flatten into patties 1/2 inch thick, and make a small hole in the center of each patty.
Fry one at a time in 1 inch of hot shortening, turning to brown on both sides. Drain on towel.
Sorry I didn’t get any pics while I was mixing it. i got so busy I forgot. This is after I mixed it and was getting ready to cut it up.
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I dont’ have a big kitchen like Granny and my table is not high so I used a plate and my counter to pat out the pieces.Then I let them hang in my hands a bit to stretch them out.
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Then toss them into the pan and let it simmer on one side….
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Then slip it over and sear the other side. If you have your heat at the right setting each one only is about 2/3 minutes. I actually had mine too hot at first and had to turn it down… It takes a little getting used to. Granny used to use a Cast Iron Skillet I forgot to mention. I didn’t have one. Use what you have but I do think cast iron is better. Gives the bread more
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Here is the final product and I topped mine off with a little Apple Butter we bought at Amana colonies to make it feel as close to Homemade like Granny’s as I could!
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Until Next Time,
Xoxo
Trisha Trixie
classic

Recipe Sunday : Rootbeer

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/lawrencehallofscience_2270_2599598

Preparation for yourself:

To get in the spirit make sure you have your RootBeer BottleCap Earrings from TrishaTrixie

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and your fabulous Steam Punk Inspired Re Constructed Apron (which will be available for purchase after Fashion Show)

Add a Fabulous lip color from Vanity and Glamour Cosmetics and you are all set. If you want to go fancier add any other makeup like Mascara from V and G and it will make you feel fabulous ready to be the RootBeer maker!

Root Beer Recipe

You’ll need these:

  • Bleach, or sanitizers from homebrewing suppliers
  • Large pot
  • Funnel
  • Measuring cups/spoons
  • ultra-fine straining tool (coffee filter, cheese cloth, or clean towel)
  • Plastic bottle and cas (2 Liter, or a few 20 oz)
  • Yeast (ale yeast, champagne yeast, or dry and active powdered baker’s yeast, but not bread-makers)
  • Sugar
  • Flavorings/herbs
  • distilled or tap water devoid of chlorine

Pre-cook tips:

  • Sanitize your supplies. Nothing is worse than spending a few hours with a liquid masterpiece only to find out it smells rank because bacteria clung to one of your supplies. Use up to 1 TBS unscented bleach per 1 gallon water. Soak for at least 1 minute in the diluted mixture and let air dry.
  • United States water supply will have minute amounts of chlorine to clean out city pipes and ward off bacteria. Chlorine can be reduced in tap water by letting it sit in a pot and air out for at least an hour.

Make the wort:

  • 4 boiling cups water
  • 1 TBS sassafras root bark
  • 2 TBS sarsaparilla root
  • 2 TBS dried wintergreen leaves
  • ½ TBS dandelion root (or dandelion tea bag)
  • ½ to 1 cinnamon stick (½ TSP powder)
  • 1 TSP coriander fruit (dried seeds, freshly crushed)
  • 1 TBS raisins (or berries of your choice)
  • 1 TBS hops (or burdock)
  • Optional: 1 dash of nutmeg, allspice, clove, and/or black pepper

I did not use the below ingredients in my first brew, but you can add or substitute these in your wort. The amounts are a starting point.

  • ½ TBS ginger root
  • 1 TBS birch bark, spruce bark, horehound, anise, or wild cherry tree bark
  • 1 TBS licorice root

Bring water to a boil. Simmer ingredients for 1 hour. Hops can be added anytime throughout the cooking process. Check out the temperature effects on the flavor of hop tea. Let wort cool to under 105 degrees F. Strain, and funnel into your bottle.

Post-wort ingredients:

  • 1 C cane sugar*
  • 1 TSP vanilla extract (more if using imitation)
  • 1 TBS honey
  • ½ TSP molasses
  • 1 to 2 TBS fresh squeezed lime/lemon juice (about 1 small lime or half a lemon)
  • Optional: fruit juices

Add your extracts, sugars, and liquids to the bottle. Shake up all the ingredients until dissolved.

Proceed to yeasting:

  • 1/4 TSP yeast (or 1/8 TSP of ale or other yeasts)
  • 1/4 C very warm water (not boiling or very hot)

Let the yeast sit in the warm water for 15 minutes. Afterwards, add this to the bottle, then top off the bottle with clean water until there’s only an inch of space from the cap. The less oxygen in there, the less oxidation (leading to off flavors and smells). But leave just a bit of room for  a foamy head (just like beer) and for fizzing when opening.

Be still and patient:

Let the yeast ferment into soda in a dark place. Or if you are lazy, cover the bottles with your leftover laundry. Wait anywhere from 4 hours to a week, depending on the temperature and complexity of the nutrients. Warm weather indoors will speed up the process compared to a cold house without a heater running. Typical time will be 1-3 days.

When the bottle doesn’t flex under firm pressure, it is ready to permanently toss into a refrigerator to inhibit further carbonation. Any lollygagging after the bottle stops giving when squeezed will only increase your risk of over-carbonation and exploding fluids. After refrigerated, the bottle will need some pressure released. Slowly loosen the cap until a faint noise lets you know the compressed gas is escaping. Let the craft root beer sit in the fridge with the slightly loosened cap. You can drink 12-24 after it has cooled. Be careful not to unscrew the cap too fast on first opening, as you might get overflowing root-beer (after all, it is carbonated soda).

* Tweaking the sugar sources will have a direct impact on the flavor. Experiment with brown sugar, 2/3 c agave nectar, honey, or other sugary substances. Sweet fruit juice can also be substituted for water and part of the sugar contents. Some sugar (glucose, fructose, dextrose, etc) needs to be present for the yeast to work its magic, but you can replace part of the sugar with stevia or other sugar alternative. If you are looking for a sugar-free alternative, you could skip the yeast and use pre-made or force carbonated water, but use a lower quantity of sugar substitute.

This recipe is from Mox and Fodder http://moxandfodder.com/2012/08/01/diy-craft-root-beer-recipe/

Here are some extra links I found about RootBeer Syrup and other related items

Rootbeer Syrup

Non Explosive RootBeer

Learning RootBeer

Gingerale and RootBeer

If you Really want to go simple buy this RootBeer Kit

Saturday Special: Saturday in the Park

This weekend it is supposed to be decent and nice here in Des Moines, Iowa. It is barely morning and people are already outside, water lawns, setting up for garage sales and washing and cleaning their cars.

It reminds me of the old days when I grew up even back in the 70’s.

We didn’t sit in front of a TV all day. We maybe got up, watched a bit of Saturday Morning Cartoons, but generally we went outside, played on our bikes and with our friends, we set up lemonade stands and played and sang together

I remember my sisters walking to places and singing songs like this song and Rhinestone Cowboy and Billy Don’t be a Hero…

We listened to oldies music and just generally enjoyed life.

We went out to Ledges and played in the water or went on hikes.

But my favorite day of the weekend, even though Saturday was pretty awesome as back then I was not this prissy gal you all know of now…I was a tomboy and loved to muck i the mud and climb trees and get lost in teh woods and get ticks in my hair…that was great…yes, but Sunday WAS my favorite day of the Weekend.

We would all sit down and watch the Disney Sunday Movie…

We would make homemade ice cream, each of us girls having a turn at the crank to mix it up good. We would add homemade berries or jelly to it or some of us would add chocolate sauce and stir up the ice cream to make it nice and chocolatey. There actually is a little running joke saying in our family

“Don’t stir the Ice Cream!”

because we would get it all over the place and make a mess!

Sometimes, we just have a simple snack dinner of homemade popcorn and Grandpa Hunter taught us to put the popcorn in milk and eat it out of our glass with a spoon…oddly enough, still today I love to eat that treat, though most people look at me funny when I do.

Ah yes, the simple times of Saturday and Sunday, when we enjoyed life.

We just enjoyed the day. Living life would exhaust us because we ACTUALLY lived it!!

So, if you can, if you are having a great day, if it is warm enough to go out and enjoy what this world has to offer, go do it. Go live it. Go drive around, roll the windows down, take the kids to a park or grill outside, or just go play ball or horseshoes or lawn darts or something.

Remember the days of the past, because tomorrow…they will be!

Until Next time,

XoXo~Trisha Trixie